Thank you for visiting. My thoughts & Feelings are my Own.

Here I will share my feelings about America and her Future.

Let it be known to all the World, I love all Humankind, however the poor actions of the few that take away the Freedom's of the many wear on my soul. I don't hate them I feel sad for their foolishness before God and humankind.

Those leaders who seek to 'Keep their Oaths of office' and those who seek only self glory, power, tyranny and the destruction of America as it was founded, hoping to turn it into a Dictatorship, Marxist or other state of Tyranny.

For a long while I was unsure of putting a blog together with my thoughts on this, however Truth must be shared, if not to Awake American's to their dangerous situation then to record the folly of the ways of the wicked who do exist in the leadership of our Nation, States, Counties, Towns. Sad that I must add this page.

"We often search for things in life, yet seldom do we find.

Those things in life that really matter, until we make the time." S.T.Huls

God Bless the Republic of America!

We have Got To Stand Up!!

Tuesday, October 16, 2012

Felix Baumgartner’s Historic Red Bull Stratos Skydive in Pictures | Video | TheBlaze.com

Felix Baumgartner’s Historic Red Bull Stratos Skydive in Pictures | Video | TheBlaze.com



Here Are 11 Incredible Pictures From Sunday’s Edge-of-Space Skydive

For months TheBlaze has been talking about Felix Baumgartner and his anticipated, record-breaking skydive from the edges of space, for which he has been preparing himself for the last five years. After the stratosphere jump was delayed due to weather concerns in the New Mexico last week, Baumgartner successfully (and safely) took on the challenge Sunday.
Here is the stats breakdown of his Red Bull Stratos project jump and accomplishments:


  • Jump Height: 128,100 feet (24.26 miles; the Karman Line, which is usually used as the boundary   between Earth and space, lies at 62 miles above sea level)

  • Time Free Falling: 4:20 minutes

  • Distance in Free Fall: 119,846 feet (22.7 miles)

  • Top Speed: Mach 1.24 (faster than the speed of sound)

  • Records:
      Highest jump Fastest ever free fall Highest manned balloon flight
    Although the numbers are impressive, the pictures show the what the stats simply can’t. Here are some of the best images:

    Felix Baumgartner Red Bull Stratos Skydive

    • Ross Franklin/APThe capsule, bottom left, and attached helium balloon carrying Felix Baumgartner lifts off as he attempts to break the speed of sound with his own body by jumping from a space capsule lifted by a helium balloon, Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012, in Roswell, N.M. Baumgartner plans to jump from an altitude of 120,000 feet, an altitude chosen to enable him to achieve Mach 1 in free fall, which would deliver scientific data to the aerospace community about human survival from high altitudes.
    • Stefan Aufschnaiter/APIn this photo provided by Red Bull, Eva Baumgartner of Austria watches her son, Felix Baumgartner, as he attempts to break the speed of sound with his own body by jumping from a space capsule lifted by a helium balloon, Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012, in Roswell, N.M. Baumgartner landed safely on Earth after a 24-mile (38.6-kilometer) jump from high the stratosphere in a dramatic, daring feat that may also have marked the world's first supersonic skydive.
    • AP/APThis image provided by Red Bull Stratos shows pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria as he jumps out of the capsule during the final manned flight for Red Bull Stratos on Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012. In a giant leap from more than 24 miles up, Baumgartner shattered the sound barrier Sunday while making the highest jump ever a tumbling, death-defying plunge from a balloon to a safe landing in the New Mexico desert.
    • AP/APThis image taken from a video monitor, provided by Red Bull Stratos, shows pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria before he jumps out of the capsule during the final manned flight for Red Bull Stratos on Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012. In a giant leap from more than 24 miles up, Baumgartner shattered the sound barrier Sunday while making the highest jump ever a tumbling, death-defying plunge from a balloon to a safe landing in the New Mexico desert.
    • Stefan Aufschnaiter/APIn this photo provided by Red Bull, pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria is seen in a screen at mission control center in the capsule during the final manned flight for Red Bull Stratos in Roswell, N.M. on Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012. Baumgartner plans to jump from an altitude of 120,000 feet, an altitude chosen to enable him to achieve Mach 1 in free fall, which would deliver scientific data to the aerospace community about human survival from high altitudes.
    • Stefan Aufschnaiter/APIn this photo provided by Red Bull, pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria is seen in a screen at mission control center in the capsule during the final manned flight for Red Bull Stratos in Roswell, N.M. on Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012. Baumgartner plans to jump from an altitude of 120,000 feet, an altitude chosen to enable him to achieve Mach 1 in free fall, which would deliver scientific data to the aerospace community about human survival from high altitudes.
    • Predrag Vuckovic/APIn this photo provided by Red Bull, pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria celebrates after his successful jump on Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012 in Roswell, N.M. Baumgartner came down safely in the eastern New Mexico desert minutes about nine minutes after jumping from his capsule 128,097 feet, or roughly 24 miles, above Earth.
    • Ross Franklin/APFelix Baumgartner, left, of Austria, celebrates with Art Thompson, Technical Project Director, after successfully jumping from a space capsule lifted by a helium balloon at a height of just over 128,000 feet above the Earth's surface, Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012, in Roswell, N.M. Baumgartner landed in the eastern New Mexico desert minutes after jumping from his capsule 28,000 feet (8,534 meters), or 24 miles (38.6-kilometer), above Earth.
    • Ross Franklin/APFelix Baumgartner, of Austria, gestures prior to speaking with the media after successfully jumping from a space capsule lifted by a helium balloon at a height of just over 128,000 feet above the Earth's surface, Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012, in Roswell, N.M.
    • Ross Franklin/APFelix Baumgartner, of Austria, pumps his fist to the crowd after successfully jumping from a space capsule lifted by a helium balloon at a height of just over 128,000 feet above the Earth's surface, Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012, in Roswell, N.M. Baumgartner came down safely in the eastern New Mexico desert minutes about nine minutes after jumping from his capsule 128,097 feet, or roughly 24 miles, above Earth.
    • Joerg Mitter/APIn this photo provided by Red Bull, family members and friends, celebrate the successful jump of pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria in Roswell, N.M. on Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012. Baumgartner came down safely in the eastern New Mexico desert minutes about nine minutes after jumping from his capsule 128,097 feet, or roughly 24 miles, above Earth.
    If you haven’t seen the completed mission yet, take a look at this version condensed into a minute and a half:
    This CBS report of the fall has audio from Baumgartner sharing his thoughts after the jump. He says, “You become so humble, you do not think about breaking records anymore.” Watch the clip:
    As a bonus video, a clever LEGO builder has already recreated Baumgartner’s jump at a 1:350 scale. Watch the miniature, block version of the jump (via io9):


    Related: The Associated Press contributed to this report.